Chicago Auto Show will continue to have largest displays in the world

The Chicago Auto Show will continue to have the largest displays staged anywhere in the world. Show organizers have been asked numerous times if the public will see a smaller show this year, and the answer came from the show's general manager for the past 20 years, Jerry Cizek.

"Not perceptibly. We have a few exhibitors that have contracted their spaces a bit, but that's to be expected - and they're still the biggest displays they stage anywhere in the world.

"It's pretty hairy out there, as we all know, " continued Cizek. "Not only our biggest, expansive displays, but smaller and specialty manufacturers are affected too - all of whose mission has changed due to the cost of fuel and their prospective markets. Our pre-show meetings start just months after the previous show closes and we've seen exhibitors who are reacting to market and consumer forces on a highly accelerated schedule. Projects that might have been on the boards for five years from now have been boosted to top-of-mind status, and the action that goes along with it has many in a state of flux.

"The public will see the fully dressed, extravagant, eye-popping Chicago Auto Show with appeal for every aspect of the family - as they've always seen and expect," said Cizek. "Remember that the second word of auto show is 'show' and this isn't our first time at the rodeo. We will still present not only the nation's biggest automotive exposition, but will do so as one of the best values for a family's entertainment dollar."

The 101st staging of the Chicago Auto Show will begin with a two-day media preview, Feb. 11-12, then segue into its traditional black-tie event, First Look for Charity, the evening of Feb. 12, and its 10-day public run, Feb. 13-22, in the nation's biggest convention center, McCormick Place.

The Chicago Automobile Trade Association's board of directors have chosen to keep the ticket costs for 2009 at $10 for adults; $5 for children 7-12; children 6 and under free when they accompany a paying parent; $5 for senior citizens age 62 and older. 

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