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Chicago Auto Show - 1905

  • 1905MotorAgeColiseumWeb22
    Featured behind a steering wheel and wearing his winged hat is Mercury (aka Hermes) the mythical god of trade, profit and commerce. The wonderful artwork appeared on the cover of the Motor Age magazine issue that reviewed the 1905 Chicago Auto Show. Articles tell about the latest in automotive technology that was on display, including automobile exhibits for brand names such as, Adams-Farwell, Holsman High-Wheel Buggy, Knox ‘waterless’ Model F, the Dual-Cylinder Auburn, and Gale Runabout. The overflow of exhibitors filled both the Coliseum and adjoining First Regiment Armory. Customers could take test rides in various types of vehicles outside the exhibition halls---weather permitting. Pictured on the right is a newspaper ad for the 1905 show that mentions the admission price of half a dollar.
  • 1905FirstRegimentArmoryWeb22
    By 1905, the number of auto-related businesses wanting to be included in the annual Chicago Auto Show had outgrown the space available in the Coliseum. To accommodate the overflow of exhibitors, the show promoters secured additional room in the adjoining First Regiment Armory. Located on the Northwest corner of Michigan Avenue and 16th Street, the Armory was home to the Illinois National Guard.
  • 1905Franklin BoyWeb22
    Like all young boys throughout the show's history, this lad proudly posed with the latest in automotive technology. The motorcar is a Franklin, with the hood removed, revealing a 24 h.p. engine. All Franklin cars were air-cooled, and by 1905 the H.H. Franklin Manufacturing Co. of Syracuse, offered a six-cylinder model.
  • 1905LocomobileWeb22
    Exhibits for Locomobile Co. of America and Peerless Motor Co. featured several body styles and an exposed, highly polished chassis. New for 1905, was the Locomobile Type E, built on a 96-inch wheelbase, with a 15/20-hp T-head four-cylinder engine.
  • 1905ColiseumWeb22
    Even snow storms failed to hamper people from attending the early shows, as evidenced in this scene from 1905. Despite the weather, vehicles were at the ready for demonstration rides for prospective customers outside the Coliseum on Wabash Ave. By 1905, an automobile row of dealerships began to form along Michigan Avenue, east of the Coliseum.