start from thebeginning

First staged in 1901, the Chicago Auto Show is the largest auto show in North America and has been held more times than any other auto exposition on the continent. This year marks the 108th edition of the Chicago Auto Show.

 
  • ThunderbirdTridon@1971Web22.jpg
    Ford’s experimental Tridon show vehicle was based on the 1971 Thunderbird, and on public display for the first time that year. Broad, low and rakish, Tridon featured a long, sleek hood and forward-thrusting fenders that created a pronounced, tri-element design. In the rear the treatment was strictly Thunderbird, with taillights deeply recessed in a broad oval frame that extended the width of the car. A depressed scoop beneath the formal “backlite” contained the-controlled-ventilation exhaust vent, flanked on either side by high-level stop-turn flashers that work in conjunction with the conventional flasher flare. Turned aluminum wheels, with a circular brushed finish, were held to the wheel by bolts around the entire perimeter of the outer wheel surface. Special tires for the Tridon were designed by Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. A flush tinted skylight strip extended across the roof over the rear passengers and wrapped over the roof pillars down to the beltline. The exterior was painted with 20 coats of a murano lacquer called Moongold Mist. All exterior glass, including the skylight strip, was amber, tinted to harmonize with the paint.
  • 005C745430B545EDB5C67F98B81C9C67.jpg
    Ford’s experimental Tridon show vehicle was based on the 1971 Thunderbird, and on public display for the first time that year. Broad, low and rakish, Tridon featured a long, sleek hood and forward-thrusting fenders that created a pronounced, tri-element design. In the rear the treatment was strictly Thunderbird, with taillights deeply recessed in a broad oval frame that extended the width of the car. A depressed scoop beneath the formal “backlite” contained the-controlled-ventilation exhaust vent, flanked on either side by high-level stop-turn flashers that work in conjunction with the conventional flasher flare. Turned aluminum wheels, with a circular brushed finish, were held to the wheel by bolts around the entire perimeter of the outer wheel surface. Special tires for the Tridon were designed by Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. A flush tinted skylight strip extended across the roof over the rear passengers and wrapped over the roof pillars down to the beltline. The exterior was painted with 20 coats of a murano lacquer called Moongold Mist. All exterior glass, including the skylight strip, was amber, tinted to harmonize with the paint.
  • 56EDFD842F044B1E8FA16A3C87307D9C.jpg
    Ford’s experimental Tridon show vehicle was based on the 1971 Thunderbird, and on public display for the first time that year. Broad, low and rakish, Tridon featured a long, sleek hood and forward-thrusting fenders that created a pronounced, tri-element design. In the rear the treatment was strictly Thunderbird, with taillights deeply recessed in a broad oval frame that extended the width of the car. A depressed scoop beneath the formal “backlite” contained the-controlled-ventilation exhaust vent, flanked on either side by high-level stop-turn flashers that work in conjunction with the conventional flasher flare. Turned aluminum wheels, with a circular brushed finish, were held to the wheel by bolts around the entire perimeter of the outer wheel surface. Special tires for the Tridon were designed by Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. A flush tinted skylight strip extended across the roof over the rear passengers and wrapped over the roof pillars down to the beltline. The exterior was painted with 20 coats of a murano lacquer called Moongold Mist. All exterior glass, including the skylight strip, was amber, tinted to harmonize with the paint.
  • 3EA55266F7F94692803AEC267CBE674D.jpg
    Ford’s experimental Tridon show vehicle was based on the 1971 Thunderbird, and on public display for the first time that year. Broad, low and rakish, Tridon featured a long, sleek hood and forward-thrusting fenders that created a pronounced, tri-element design. In the rear the treatment was strictly Thunderbird, with taillights deeply recessed in a broad oval frame that extended the width of the car. A depressed scoop beneath the formal “backlite” contained the-controlled-ventilation exhaust vent, flanked on either side by high-level stop-turn flashers that work in conjunction with the conventional flasher flare. Turned aluminum wheels, with a circular brushed finish, were held to the wheel by bolts around the entire perimeter of the outer wheel surface. Special tires for the Tridon were designed by Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. A flush tinted skylight strip extended across the roof over the rear passengers and wrapped over the roof pillars down to the beltline. The exterior was painted with 20 coats of a murano lacquer called Moongold Mist. All exterior glass, including the skylight strip, was amber, tinted to harmonize with the paint.